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  • Thoughts on these mounting brackets...

    I've been trying to think of a way to somewhat secure the two 22L water jerry cans behind the two front seats.

    I'm testing using the existing seat bolts to attach 3.5mm steel brackets then looping a ratchet strap around the jerry. Seems secure.

    Can anyone see any issues with using these bolts? The brackets obviously raise the bolts 3.5 mm but they seem long enough to hold everything in place.

    IMG_7162.JPG IMG_7164.JPG
    IMG_7167.JPG
    2009 NT GLS Manual DiD, Cool Silver Metallic, OEM alloy nudge bar, Falken Wildpeak AT3W 265/65R17 116T, OzTec shocks & raised King springs, BushSkinz alloy intercooler & sump bash plates, BushSkinz steel side steps/sliders, ARB alloy mesh rack, Ultra Vision light bar, work in progress...

  • #2
    Is it possible to check underneath if the bolt is still all the way through the thread insert in the floor? I'm guessing they're longer than they need to be, but checking will make sure. I'm thinking that's only possible issue with this-ensuring bolt is still engaging as much as possible. Looks like a good idea

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    • #3
      Just take one bolt to hardware shop and get required amount of bolts 3.5 mm longer.

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      • #4
        Hard to tell from those pics BUT

        I suspect under hard braking the container will want to accelerate through your seat. there really needs to be a hook on the back of it as well so that it work great in compression and tension. At present it will be brilliant in acceleration but i am not convinced it will be as good in braking. Maybe more pics would be good
        95 White LWB Panda coloured GLS TD28 running 18psi 2inch lift, 2 inch body lift, factory rear LSD maxxis bighorn muddies 25,000klms after total engine rebuild - Club reged Currently around 307,000klms

        Daughters - 2003 NP Exceed Silver Bone stoke getting a engine rebuild after a Major overheat (previous owner) - My current project

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        • #5
          Originally posted by oldn64 View Post
          Hard to tell from those pics BUT

          I suspect under hard braking the container will want to accelerate through your seat. there really needs to be a hook on the back of it as well so that it work great in compression and tension. At present it will be brilliant in acceleration but i am not convinced it will be as good in braking. Maybe more pics would be good
          The way the strap loops around, it compresses the container to the floor. It seems very secure but obviously in the case of an accident forces are hard to
          Imagine. The aim was to prevent it turning into a missile without drilling extra holes in the floor which I think I’ve done.
          2009 NT GLS Manual DiD, Cool Silver Metallic, OEM alloy nudge bar, Falken Wildpeak AT3W 265/65R17 116T, OzTec shocks & raised King springs, BushSkinz alloy intercooler & sump bash plates, BushSkinz steel side steps/sliders, ARB alloy mesh rack, Ultra Vision light bar, work in progress...

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          • #6
            Are you allowed to use seat mounts for other purposes? What are the legalities of modifying seat mounts. In my dodge eyes this would work well but what happens when things go a bit pear shaped?
            Scooby, Scott, Scooter, Whatever.

            Pajero 2013 NW VRX DID Auto. Basically Stock. 200k. Heavier rear springs to tow the GG’s. Automate also to tow the GG,s.

            Pajero 2002 NM GLS V6 Auto. Basically stock. 355k.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Scooby View Post
              Are you allowed to use seat mounts for other purposes? What are the legalities of modifying seat mounts. In my dodge eyes this would work well but what happens when things go a bit pear shaped?
              Not sure. Hard to find anything online, might give VicRoads a call.
              2009 NT GLS Manual DiD, Cool Silver Metallic, OEM alloy nudge bar, Falken Wildpeak AT3W 265/65R17 116T, OzTec shocks & raised King springs, BushSkinz alloy intercooler & sump bash plates, BushSkinz steel side steps/sliders, ARB alloy mesh rack, Ultra Vision light bar, work in progress...

              Comment


              • #8
                Thinking about the dynamics of your proposed bolting, here are my thoughts...

                1 In a prang your body will continue to move forward and be restrained by the seat belt. Say you weigh 75 kg. The seat belts and their mountings are designed for at least double that weight, probably more. So the extra loading imposed on the bolts and mounting point by a 25 kg worth of jerry can will be well within normal limits, assuming that you don't weigh 150 kg.

                2 The loading imposed by a human body on the seat belt mounting will be in shear ie a sideways pull on the bolt, trying to shear it in half. The extra loading imposed by the jerry cans will probably be in shear as well, so refer to the above about the marginal extra loading on the seat belt bolts. Now, if the jerry cans tent to fly vertically up and impose some direct tensional loading on the bolts, this is actually better for the bolt loading because the allowable shear loading is generally taken as half the direct tension loading, so you a reducing the loading on the bolt is all the water loading goes into direct tension, compared to direct shear loading.

                3 In a prang, the jerry cans will probably tend to g straight forward and be retrained by the seats. Yes - there will be extra loading on the seat slides and anchorages, but when you consider that half of the seal belt loads will be taken by the seat frame and slides (because the buckle part of the seat belt bolts directly onto the seat). So my comments above re the marginal extra loading still applies for the jerry can pushing into the rear of the seat. The slides and seat frame would have taken the extra loading if it had been through the seat belt webbing anyway, so it is no different to the situation in 1 above.

                4 Regarding the loading on the seat backrest in a prang, yes - there will be some extra forward forces which are not normal loading. In my NL Pajero, I was hit up the rear by a Commodore driver who was looking at his computer. It did wonders to his Commodore, but barely scratched the paint on my Pajero - most of the car went under my chassis rails and the towbar too most of the impact. I was stopped at traffic lights and this guy hit me at about 60 km/h. Being level ground, I didn't have my foot on the brake, and my Pajero was violently accelerated - to the point where both front seats collapsed backwards. In the fight with the Insurance company, I did some basic maths calculations to determine the g forces which my wife and I were subjected to. I reckoned at the time it was something like 5 gs. Apparently, the seats are designed for 2g forces. We both got whiplash injuries, but because of the technicalities of the Victorian third party laws, we just shut up and suffered with them ,. My wife is OK, I still suffer back problems to this day. Anyway, the deceleration forces applied by a 25 kg jerry can mounted low (on the floor in fact) will be far lass than what collapsed the seat back in my NL Pajero (albeit loading the other way). I see no problems with the jerry cans crushing the seats.

                5 In the horrid event that you overturn, the situation will be as in 1 above - you will have an extra 25 kg of force on the belts and anchorages.

                6. As long as you don't physically alter the seat belt anchorages, and the OEM bolts still have enough thread to fully engage the captive nuts in the anchorages, I can see no reason that this arrangement would be more unsafe than the original design. If you have to get new bolts (from memory, they are 7/16" UNF), make sure that the tensile strength equals or exceeds the OEM bolts used.

                7 PM me if you want to discuss this further.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by willneill View Post

                  Not sure. Hard to find anything online, might give VicRoads a call.
                  Vic Roads will tell you no way. They are risk adverse non technical people.
                  Seat mounting bolts have a "7" on the head so this is a medium tensile bolt, also known as Metric 8.8 grade. I think they are M8 but I would need to remove a bolt to check. An M8 8.8 grade bolts has a shear strength of 1500kg and given that there are 4 bolts holding the seat down that is 6000kg total. Even if the seat occupant was 200kg and the seat weighed 50kg, the bolts have a 25x safety factor in shear and more in tension?

                  Poke your head under the car and look to ensure the bolts have at least 2 threads protruding from the welded on nut on the floor pan.
                  If you need longer bolts the why not replace the bolts with M8 Garde 8.8 lifting eye bolts and hook the straps on to these.

                  OJ.

                  2011 PB Base White Auto, Smartbar, Cooper STMaxx LT235/85R-16,TPMS, HR TB, 3 x Bushskinz, front +40mm Dobinson , rear +50mm EHDVR Lovells, Dobinson MT struts and shockers, Peddars 5899 cone springs, Windcheater rack, GME UHF, Custom alloy drawer system inc. 30lt Engel & 2 x 30 AH LiFePo batteries + elec controls, Tailgate hi-lift/long struts, Phillips +100 LB & HB, Lightforce 20" single row driving beam LED lightbar, Scanguage II.
                  MM4x4 Auto Mate, Serial No 1 .

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                  • #10
                    Looks like a nasty gash on the foot awaits anyone who jumps in the back seat??
                    2014 NW MY14 3.2 DID GLX-R Auto. Champagne in colour!
                    MM Lockup mate. King KCRS-35 rear springs. Monroe Gas Magnum TDT rear shocks. 3M color stable tint all round. Spare wheel lift kit. 'Dynamat' in all doors. Pioneer AVH-Z5150BT Head Unit. Upgraded Speakers. Rear USB outlet. Factory nudge bar with LED light bar. Provent catch can. LED interior lights.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Keithyv View Post
                      Looks like a nasty gash on the foot awaits anyone who jumps in the back seat??
                      Agree, but can be fixed with lifting eye bolts, if they are M8 then;
                      http://www.boltmasters.com.au/liftin...&SID=443049909

                      OJ.
                      2011 PB Base White Auto, Smartbar, Cooper STMaxx LT235/85R-16,TPMS, HR TB, 3 x Bushskinz, front +40mm Dobinson , rear +50mm EHDVR Lovells, Dobinson MT struts and shockers, Peddars 5899 cone springs, Windcheater rack, GME UHF, Custom alloy drawer system inc. 30lt Engel & 2 x 30 AH LiFePo batteries + elec controls, Tailgate hi-lift/long struts, Phillips +100 LB & HB, Lightforce 20" single row driving beam LED lightbar, Scanguage II.
                      MM4x4 Auto Mate, Serial No 1 .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by erad View Post
                        Thinking about the dynamics of your proposed bolting, here are my thoughts....
                        Thank you! This is the info I was after.
                        2009 NT GLS Manual DiD, Cool Silver Metallic, OEM alloy nudge bar, Falken Wildpeak AT3W 265/65R17 116T, OzTec shocks & raised King springs, BushSkinz alloy intercooler & sump bash plates, BushSkinz steel side steps/sliders, ARB alloy mesh rack, Ultra Vision light bar, work in progress...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I always thought the purpose of having the seatbelt attached directly to the frame/chassis of the vehicle and not the seat meant the weight of the seat (and occupant) during an accident is minimal?

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                          • #14
                            Mitsubishi make the seat belt buckle attach to the seat frame to minimise the complications of fastening the buckle. This means that the weight of the occupant plus the weight of the seat must be ultimately transferred to the chassis of the car via the seat frame. If they had the seat belt just fastened to the floor, the weight of the seat (which is fairly considerable) can effectively be ignored. But if the seat was not latched properly, then it too would be needing to be restrained by the seat belt, so why not do it properly in the first place?

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