Below Nav Bar Ad Module

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

DiD NT Fuel Starvation Thread - In tank Filter

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Obviously, the in-tank filter is rather heavily blocked with gunk. When you start the engine, the fuel pump draws a full flow of fuel, using only what the engine needs and returning the rest back to the tank. The losses occurring in the in-tank filter are high enough that the pressure in the fuel line (in the engine bay at least) is going below atmospheric, and you are sucking some air into the fuel system. The engine stops. By filling the tank to over half full, you are bringing the overall pressure in the engine bay and the main filter to enough so that the air leak is not enough to stop the engine. Clean the in-tank filter and your problems should hopefully go away.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by erad View Post
      Obviously, the in-tank filter is rather heavily blocked with gunk. When you start the engine, the fuel pump draws a full flow of fuel, using only what the engine needs and returning the rest back to the tank. The losses occurring in the in-tank filter are high enough that the pressure in the fuel line (in the engine bay at least) is going below atmospheric, and you are sucking some air into the fuel system. The engine stops. By filling the tank to over half full, you are bringing the overall pressure in the engine bay and the main filter to enough so that the air leak is not enough to stop the engine. Clean the in-tank filter and your problems should hopefully go away.
      Thanks a lot for the explanation. Made it very clear to someone not as technically informed as myself. I will ensure the fuel is kept at a safe level to avoid this happening, and till I have the parts with me and ready to embark on this as a DIY. I admit I have never ventured to such DIYs in the past, but this forum and members have been inspirational.
      Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

      Comment


      • #18
        The losses may not all be in the in-tank filter. Your main fuel filter could be blocked to the point where the pressure falls once past this filter. The easiest one to check is the main filter. If it hasn't been replaced for a while, get a new one and do that. Your problems may go away. If they still persist, then it has to be the in-tank filter. Access to this requires you to lift the second row seat and undo a hatch on the right side of the car. Then you get access to the fuel tank and another hatch.


        If you are having troubles now, even going up a steep hill could cause fuel starvation because the filter is mounted above the fuel tank level, and going uphill, the difference becomes even greater. Check for hardened or split hoses around your fuel filter, and if they are bad, replace the hoses. Hopefully this will minimise air leaks then. Finding air leaks is very difficult, so it is best to examine the components and replace them if they are suspect.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by erad View Post
          The losses may not all be in the in-tank filter. Your main fuel filter could be blocked to the point where the pressure falls once past this filter. The easiest one to check is the main filter. If it hasn't been replaced for a while, get a new one and do that. Your problems may go away. If they still persist, then it has to be the in-tank filter. Access to this requires you to lift the second row seat and undo a hatch on the right side of the car. Then you get access to the fuel tank and another hatch.
          This video will be my guide to replacing the in-tank filter.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIZf...Q&index=2&t=0s


          Originally posted by erad View Post
          If you are having troubles now, even going up a steep hill could cause fuel starvation because the filter is mounted above the fuel tank level, and going uphill, the difference becomes even greater. Check for hardened or split hoses around your fuel filter, and if they are bad, replace the hoses. Hopefully this will minimise air leaks then. Finding air leaks is very difficult, so it is best to examine the components and replace them if they are suspect.
          The main fuel filter has been replaced as part of scheduled servicing, however i am certain the in-fuel filter is usually forgotten. Also, the symptoms i face are exactly as described by others on this thread previously, hence the added focus on that being the solution. The car runs perfectly otherwise.
          Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

          Comment


          • #20
            That video is fantastic. I ope that I never have to get in there to replace mine, but now I know what to expect.

            Comment


            • #21
              What about the diesel bacteria for blocked suction filters ? ,I have had problems in off road vehicles and it can cause no end of fuel suction and filter issues ..
              NT Exceed ,almost stock .

              Comment


              • #22
                Replaced the in-tank fuel filter on my Pajero over the weekend. The bolts on the metallic fuel cap were an absolute PITA to remove owing to rust(??) and dirt. Some WD40 helped on some of them, but a couple of the bolts sheared off. Wonder what i am going to do about those now.

                Fuel filter is replaced and i wont be topping up the tank this time before i get to the 1/4 mark, to check if the original starvation issue has been resolved.

                You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                This gallery has 3 photos.
                Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by bennyb29 View Post
                  Replaced the in-tank fuel filter on my Pajero over the weekend. The bolts on the metallic fuel cap were an absolute PITA to remove owing to rust(??) and dirt. Some WD40 helped on some of them, but a couple of the bolts sheared off. Wonder what i am going to do about those now.

                  Fuel filter is replaced and i wont be topping up the tank this time before i get to the 1/4 mark, to check if the original starvation issue has been resolved.
                  I also did mine last month but it wasnt near as dirty as yours. How many k's have you done? Lots of country fill ups? Do you use any Additives like CEM ?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by swys42 View Post

                    I also did mine last month but it wasnt near as dirty as yours. How many k's have you done? Lots of country fill ups? Do you use any Additives like CEM ?
                    My car has now done 200,600 kms as of this morning, and is a 2010 model. Evidently, this filter was never replaced in the last 10 years.
                    In the past 5 years since i had the car, most of the fuel fills have been from metro regions. Ofcourse, there have been the couple of outback trips, plus the interstate runs. I don't use any additives at all, so not sure if that's a reason.


                    Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      To update this thread:
                      After replacing the in-tank fuel filter on my car, the fuel starvation issue i had as described on this thread has been resolved.
                      Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by bennyb29 View Post
                        To update this thread:
                        After replacing the in-tank fuel filter on my car, the fuel starvation issue i had as described on this thread has been resolved.
                        Seems to be very hit and miss withe the in tank filter. 337,000 on ours and still with the original filter. We never use no name fuel and always use Caltex Vortex or BP Ultra. Used Shell once and it ran like a dog, so never again.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          It is probably a good idea to use a fuel additive which prevents fungus buildup in the tank. It will prevent the fungus from forming and if you already have it on the filter, it will probably help to dissolve the fungus, thereby eliminating the need to get into the tank a nd replace the filter.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BruceandBobbi View Post

                            Seems to be very hit and miss withe the in tank filter. 337,000 on ours and still with the original filter. We never use no name fuel and always use Caltex Vortex or BP Ultra. Used Shell once and it ran like a dog, so never again.
                            I am not the first owner of my car, so not sure about what servos the first owner used for close to 90ks before i got it.
                            I usually stick to Caltex or Costco diesel.

                            Reading other comments, l realise i don't use any fuel additives, so not sure if that's a contributor.
                            Mitsubishi Pajero NT Platinum 2010

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Always have used additives Benny.

                              Comment

                              Matched content

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X