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Engine breaking with manual use diff lock or not.

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  • Engine breaking with manual use diff lock or not.

    This appears to be one of the more vexing questions. You have shelled out for front diff lock to match the factory rear one and have a manual with the Marks Brothers low range transfer gear so have 1:45 reduction so now have good down hill engine breaking. On the extremely steep and rocky or muddy downhill runs that you would use all diff locks to crawl up should you engage diff locks or not going downhill? I have played both ways and tend to prefer to have them locked in but have not approached a seriously long and slippery downhill run. Oh yes do not have downhill assist.
    2014 PC Challenger, manual, factory tow-bar, factory front diff protector, TJM inter-cooler plate, Bushskinz manual transmission protection plate, ProRack S16 roof racks, front elocker, Drummond Motor Sport front struts, custom 16mm King rear springs with Bilstein Dampeners, Buzz Rack Runner 3 bike platform, Eclipse Nav head unit, GME TX3800BW UHF, 16x8 CSA Raptor rims, 265/75R16 Maxxis MT-762, orToyo AT/2 265/70R16 Triton rims, BFGoodrich 235/85/R16 Triton rims, or Factory tyres and rims.

  • #2
    I probably under-use my front locker, especially downhill since I find the limits on steering can be a bit tricky if you want to quickly change your line (and things happen more quickly downhill than uphill ). Of course, engine breaking with low gearing is the key factor, but I usually switch on my rear locker on steep descents.

    FWIW, ARB have this spiel on their website: "On downhill descents a vehicle with an open diff can experience a sliding effect as drive transfers from one axle to the other. A rear Air Locker will counteract this motion giving more control and a safer, slowed descent."

    One of the reasons I usually use my rear locker is that it not only gives better traction but it also switches off the Paj's automatic traction control and ABS which especially on steep rocky tracks can react in a disconcerting manner. I'd rather pre-emptively use the locker.
    BY13/MY14 Pajero NW GLX Auto, Cooper ST Maxx, factory towbar, Drifta drawers, SmartBar, Airtec snorkel, Koni 90 front and Bilstein 6272 rear shocks with Lovell HD springs, Brown Davis i/c, sump and transmission bash plates, Piranha diff breathers, Fuel Manager pre-filter, LRA 81L auxiliary fuel tank, Piranha steel battery tray, Sherpa 9500 lb winch, HPD catch can, LockUp Mate, Kaon cargo barrier, Harrop front e-locker, DBA T3 rotors and Xtreme pads, Mark's 4WD reduction gears

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    • #3
      My opinion, rear only for descents.

      When climbing, the front is generally lightly loaded, it's pulling the vehicle in the direction you want to go, and it's easy for one front wheel to fractionally spin and allow steering.

      On descents, the front is more heavily loaded, and gravity is attempting to push the vehicle where it wants to go. If the front diff is locked one front wheel must break traction to steer - while the wheels are not pulling, and are more heavily loaded. It's giving gravity every chance to wreak havoc.

      With 2 of 3 diffs locked it will still take three wheels to lose traction before runaway. And the remaining wheel that isn't sliding can still steer.
      NT Platinum. DiD Auto with 265/70R17 ST Maxx, Lift, Lockers, Lockup Mate, Low range reduction, LRA Aux tank, bull bar, winch, lots of touring stuff. Flappy paddles. MMCS is gone!

      Project: NJ SWB. 285/75R16 ST Maxx, 2" OME suspension, 2" body lift, ARB 110, 120l tank, bullbar, scratches, no major dents. Fully engineered in SA. NW DiD & auto in place - a long way to go....

      Scorpro Explorer Box

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      • #4
        Originally posted by nj swb View Post
        My opinion, rear only for descents.

        When climbing, the front is generally lightly loaded, it's pulling the vehicle in the direction you want to go, and it's easy for one front wheel to fractionally spin and allow steering.

        On descents, the front is more heavily loaded, and gravity is attempting to push the vehicle where it wants to go. If the front diff is locked one front wheel must break traction to steer - while the wheels are not pulling, and are more heavily loaded. It's giving gravity every chance to wreak havoc.

        With 2 of 3 diffs locked it will still take three wheels to lose traction before runaway. And the remaining wheel that isn't sliding can still steer.
        Bingo!
        MY21 NX Pajero
        a few mods to come !

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        • #5
          Thanks. Makes sense. Use rear diff lock when descending the tricky stuff but not the front one.

          On steering I found with the Challenger even with the front diff lock engaged steering would still happen remarkably well but you can feel the binding up of the vehicle so I take care as the torque multiplier of the after market 2.7 transfer gear would be loading up the drive train to levels Mitsubishi would not have designed for.
          2014 PC Challenger, manual, factory tow-bar, factory front diff protector, TJM inter-cooler plate, Bushskinz manual transmission protection plate, ProRack S16 roof racks, front elocker, Drummond Motor Sport front struts, custom 16mm King rear springs with Bilstein Dampeners, Buzz Rack Runner 3 bike platform, Eclipse Nav head unit, GME TX3800BW UHF, 16x8 CSA Raptor rims, 265/75R16 Maxxis MT-762, orToyo AT/2 265/70R16 Triton rims, BFGoodrich 235/85/R16 Triton rims, or Factory tyres and rims.

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          • #6
            I like NJ SWB would not use the front locker on the decent things can happen too fast ans steering is a key requirement. not to mention it also would be part of the braking system too in a decent seeing the weight will be mostly on the front. So anything to help you safely navigate what you climbed or even something you didnt would be a great idea.

            Cheers
            95 White LWB Panda coloured GLS TD28 running 18psi 2inch lift, 2 inch body lift, factory rear LSD maxxis bighorn muddies 25,000klms after total engine rebuild - Club reged Currently around 307,000klms

            Daughters - 2003 NP Exceed Silver Bone stoke getting a engine rebuild after a Major overheat (previous owner) - My current project

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