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  • Valve stem seals

    Hi Guru's,

    Haven't been here in a while (work, family, covid, etc, etc) and FM the place has changed, LOL...

    Anyway, really, REALLY need to replace the valve stem seals on the old beast, amongst a few other things (cam belt, lash adjusters, plugs, etc).
    Can anyone recommend a decent replacement for the valve stem seals on the old 6G74 SOHC?
    Planing to do a major (as in the above mentioned items) service to the old chariot over the christmas break, but can't find any reliable info on the stem seals.

    TIA,

    Marz.

  • #2
    I would try Mal at Mitsfix in Bayswater. He is handy to you and I found he knows Mitsubishis and was very helpful to me. 03 9761 6270.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you mean as a DIY job?

      I have replaced valve stem seals as a DIY job on a 6G74 and 6G75.
      It is not difficult, but tedious.

      On my old 6G74 I replaced the seals at ~194Kkm, it was using 1L per 2,000km.
      Oil would then remain at the MAX level over 10,000km oil change intervals.
      At 273Kkm it still used no oil. At that stage I did a 6G75 swap and did a preventative valve stem seal replacement on that engine while on a stand.
      Overall with the right tools it is not difficult at all. With a helping hand it's a breeze.

      I used FelPro valve stem seals. They are vitton rubber and very high quality. They are pretty cheap at about $50 for a set however I ordered them from the US so there's a delay (plus shipping costs these days are going up).

      To keep the valve up I used a leakdown tester and compressed air in the cylinder.
      I also used generic valve spring remover tools and a kit to replace the actual seal (special pliers and special socket to push them down into the seat).

      Being the SOHC motor just the rocker arms need removing. The camshaft can stay put.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Guys,

        I'll give Mitsfix a call. Was more after (as Spetz mentioned) brand names and/or part numbers.
        It will be DIY job, I don't have a problem doing it. I won't be taking the heads off, so yer any info on what the best tool to use to compress the springs would be very much apreicated.

        Thanks again,

        Marz.

        Comment


        • #5
          I did a write up on how to do it if it helps. I used home made tools which worked well.

          I also purchased the seals from the US. Rock auto Big saving over buying here

          Comment


          • #6
            I used Repco for parts when I did the valve stem seals on the NM.
            Think it was Felpro also.
            Changed the hydraulic adjusters too but still have some ticks from time to time.
            Cannot remember the prices but was only $50-100 dearer than cheapest fleabay prices.
            Was burning 3 litres of 20w50 oil at 10000km services.
            I didn’t trust myself to use air to hold the valves up. I probably would knock the air hose off.
            So I just wound the piston to the top of the bore on the cylinder I was changing.
            The valves would drop through the old seals easy and rest on the piston.
            The new seals would hold the valves up.
            Scooby, Scott, Scooter, Whatever.

            Pajero 2013 NW VRX DID Auto. Basically Stock. 200k. Heavier rear springs to tow the GG’s. Automate also to tow the GG,s.

            Pajero 2002 NM GLS V6 Auto. Basically stock. 355k.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think I only paid $15 au for the seals from rock auto. Closeout special for decent quality ones. Shipping $20, but order any other bits you might need and makes it well worthwhile.

              Here's the kicker though, they sent me around 350 seals! I thought I stuffed up and ordered that many, but I didn't. Would normally try and get them back to the seller, but not worth it being in the US. Sold them cheap on eBay and made back most of the cost of that order (had heaps in it) and gave others a bargain at the same time

              Comment


              • #8
                Scooby wrote, in part "I didn’t trust myself to use air to hold the valves up. I probably would knock the air hose off.
                So I just wound the piston to the top of the bore on the cylinder I was changing.
                The valves would drop through the old seals easy and rest on the piston.
                The new seals would hold the valves up."


                I haven't done this job myself, but I have read about feeding some string/rope down the spark plug hole and then cranking the piston up to the point where it will no go any further ie the rope has filled the combustion chamber, and then do the seals. Safer than relying on air to do the job. Air will be OK as long as the piston is at BOTTOM DEAD CENTRE ie it can go no further, but I would prefer the rope method. If using air, you would have to have a spark plug adaptor screwed into the hole, and , of course a secure supply of 100 psi air.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have used the rope method and it is worse than the compressed air method.
                  With the rope method the valve can still move down slightly by a few mm, which when compressing the spring and trying to reinsert the collets makes things much more difficult.
                  Plus it is more time consuming as you need to spin the engine to BTC for that cylinder, insert the rope, spin the engine again to compress the rope. Likely introducing lots of debris into the cylinder too.
                  With the compressed air method I used a leakdown tester, while removing/installing the springs I set the PSI pretty high, but outside of that I only fed about 15psi into the cylinder just to keep the valve afloat.


                  As far as tools needed, these are what I used:
                  1. To remove the collets I used this tool. It has a magnet in it so you put it on the retainer and smack it with a rubber hammer. Worked perfectly. You can likely rig something up with a socket and a strong magnet inside it
                  https://www.amazon.com.au/Lisle-3620...05846246&psc=1

                  2. To compress the valve spring I used this tool. It also worked really well but I used a longer hydraulic lift handle for leverage to compress the springs. Made life easy
                  https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...eOaBf0Q9pwGCAU

                  3. To remove the old and install the new valve stem seal I used the below too. The Fel-Pro seals also came with a plastic cap to put over the valve stem to avoid damaging the seals. I used that and also used engine oil to easily slide them over with no risk of damaging them
                  https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/28436404...iABEgKJk_D_BwE


                  All these tools worked perfectly on 6G7X motors for me.
                  I'm happy to lend them to you (with a security deposit) and give you advice if you need it. I am in Berwick VIC which isn't too far from you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Friggin LEGEND'S all of you guys....

                    Hat's off to disco stu for the in-depth process and awesome fabricobbling of bits to achieve the job, ken legend..... Stay tuned, I'm going to do something similar coz I'm that way inclined/put together, LOL..

                    Spetz, thank you so much for the info on the tools you used, excellent. My creative juices have started to flow and I really like the Lisle tool (even though your review mentioned some down-sides). I think I could fabricobble something that would combine the Lisle tool and lever action style compressor to over-come your problem with using the Lisle tool on the rear cylinders, stay tuned, LOL..

                    I think I'll take the compressed air route (got a big ass compressor, so no shortage of air...), but I do subscribe to the rope practice (and may well use it, dunno, we'll see), best way I know of stopping a piston moving in any two stroke engine, so should work in a four banger if the rope is compacted enough.

                    Made an impulse buy with regard to the valve stem seals (old mans disease, forgot whom made decent gaskets and seals (Felpro)), grabbed a set of Permaseal seals (the name rang a bell from way back in the my Holden 6 & V8 days). Not as cheap as you blokes mentioned (AU$100.00), but I'm planing to do this job over the christmas break so really can't rely on postage from the good ol' US of A.....

                    BIG THANK YOU TO SPETZ FOR THE OFFER OF THE USE OF YOUR TOOLS. Can't say I'd do the same in hindsight, been screwed over several times doing the same!
                    Again, THANK YOU.

                    Now...... To find a used head to perform experiments on, LOL....
                    Pick-a-part here I come.

                    Stay tuned folks, I'll update soon.

                    Marz.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Glad that could help you. I was always too nervous of jobs like this when I was younger, so I hoped my write up might give someone more confidence.

                      Have to admit, the rope method was a total pain to do like mentioned. At that time I didn't have a compressor, but I was also nervous about the air failing at the wrong time etc. Engine was on a stand and I was in no rush as the car wasn't registered.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by disco stu View Post
                        Glad that could help you. I was always too nervous of jobs like this when I was younger, so I hoped my write up might give someone more confidence.

                        Have to admit, the rope method was a total pain to do like mentioned. At that time I didn't have a compressor, but I was also nervous about the air failing at the wrong time etc. Engine was on a stand and I was in no rush as the car wasn't registered.
                        Just for you stu, coz I like the way you do/did things:
                        The engineer has been, and is, a maker of history. James Kip Finch

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is the type of valve spring compressor I used.

                          https://www.supercheapauto.com.au/p/...ressor&start=6

                          It may not be the same and the one I had was a little big but I got the job done.

                          From memory with the piston at TDC the valves slide into the cylinder maybe 20mm at most, and when the new seals were fitted they held the valve up while installing the compressed spring, cap and collets.

                          Remember compressed air will push the piston to BDC and turn the engine in what ever direction it wants to achieve this, so watch vee belts and things. As you will probably have all the spark plugs out it will turn easy.
                          Scooby, Scott, Scooter, Whatever.

                          Pajero 2013 NW VRX DID Auto. Basically Stock. 200k. Heavier rear springs to tow the GG’s. Automate also to tow the GG,s.

                          Pajero 2002 NM GLS V6 Auto. Basically stock. 355k.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Marz View Post

                            Just for you stu, coz I like the way you do/did things:
                            The engineer has been, and is, a maker of history. James Kip Finch
                            I always regretted not doing engineering actually. Just wish I knew back then how my mind worked. Not sure I've got it in me for further study.

                            You seem like a fellow tight arse who also can't help themselves!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The Lisle tool worked perfectly for removing the collets.
                              I only advised the socket with a magnet option as the Lisle tool is $50+ and it basically just has a magnet inside it.
                              It can also reinstall the collets however for me this really didn't work. I managed to get it to work only once and then decided to do reinstall them with the valve spring compressor.
                              On other heads it works well though (as per YouTube videos).
                              It's limitation is that you need to have space to swing the hammer.

                              On cylinders where you don't have the space to swing the hammer you can just use the valve spring compressor to press down on the retainer and have a magnet near the collets to capture them. Sometimes these collets are stuck in place though especially on older engines with varnish etc.

                              I too used the rope method only as I didn't have an air compressor at the time - Definitely use compressed air if that option is available, it makes the job much easier.


                              RE the used head to do experiments, you really don't need to, if you watch some videos of it you'll be fine.
                              You just need to remove the rocker arms (careful, lash adjusters will fly out).
                              After that there's plenty of space and access.

                              You just need to be meticulous, organized and keep everything clean.
                              As mentioned I am happy to offer advice if you need it when you start the project

                              Comment

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