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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jasonmc73 View Post
    Have you ever thought of some preventative treatment measures to slow up the process?
    Well, I wasn't aware of this preventative treatments until recently. I had a pretty cheap second hand, small car and it outlived the rust

    Now I just bought some of this fluid film: https://www.tbs-aachen.de/Fluid_Film...1993_14613.htm
    I will see how it will perform over time. But that Valvoline seems pretty good.

    But some of these places are pretty hidden and if you're not aware of them it can bite you

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    • #17
      Originally posted by crispus View Post


      But some of these places are pretty hidden and if you're not aware of them it can bite you
      I for one appreciate your feedback as it help me understand where to clean etc.

      Regarding your earlier post re rust convertor, i do like this stuff called Fertan

      I've used it for years, we sell it at work is how i know about it.
      It definately turns rust into black shiney stuff, but it can't create magic & fix full on cancer

      http://chemtech.net.au/Fertan%20Feat...ts%20NOV09.pdf



      Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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      • #18
        I used Fertan too. I used it on the sill's exterior. It was a superficial layer of rust, I cleaned it with a wire brush and applied this product. The rust went black and I will keep an eye on it to see how this will evolve.

        After about 2 months (winter/spring road conditions) the rust starts to resurface. I applied it once more after there was no risk of snow / salt on the roads and I will apply some Fluid film as well...

        I can't find now an youtube clip: there was a car with some type of paint/teroson/etc underneath and it looked ok, but the under that layer the rust was extremely bad. At least with these types of products (fertan, fluid film, lanoline, etc) you can see the rust and act before it is too late...

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        • #19
          Originally posted by crispus View Post
          I used Fertan too. I used it on the sill's exterior. It was a superficial layer of rust, I cleaned it with a wire brush and applied this product. The rust went black and I will keep an eye on it to see how this will evolve.

          After about 2 months (winter/spring road conditions) the rust starts to resurface. I applied it once more after there was no risk of snow / salt on the roads and I will apply some Fluid film as well...
          Your conditions are like driving in the ocean on every salted outing i guess.

          I think it would help, more barrier to clean it up well, apply Fertan, mask it up & paint it, then apply your fluid film.
          Last edited by Jasonmc73; 2 weeks ago.
          Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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          • #20
            A hint for those of us who are lucky enough to live in Oz or NZ. In wintertime, the roads in the mountains are often salted to thaw the ice. Many years ago, I was stuck in a line of traffic whilst someone had slid off the road ahead. There was no ice on the road - the surface was very wet. I don't know why, but I opened the door and leant down and dabbed my finger on the road and tasted the water. It was ultra salty - I reckoned even saltier than sea water. After that episode, every time I drove on a road which I suspected as being salted, I diligently hosed as much of the underside of the car as possible. If the roads were wet further down the mountain, I reckoned that the spray from the road surface would have washed the salt away, so I didn't bother to wash the car then. Age, Arthritis and a bit of common sense - I don't go skiing any more, but I still occasionally drive these roads in winter, so this still applies.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by erad
              A hint for those of us who are lucky enough to live in Oz or NZ. In wintertime, the roads in the mountains are often salted to thaw the ice. Many years ago, I was stuck in a line of traffic whilst someone had slid off the road ahead. There was no ice on the road - the surface was very wet. I don't know why, but I opened the door and leant down and dabbed my finger on the road and tasted the water. It was ultra salty - I reckoned even saltier than sea water. After that episode, every time I drove on a road which I suspected as being salted, I diligently hosed as much of the underside of the car as possible. If the roads were wet further down the mountain, I reckoned that the spray from the road surface would have washed the salt away, so I didn't bother to wash the car then. Age, Arthritis and a bit of common sense - I don't go skiing any more, but I still occasionally drive these roads in winter, so this still applies.
              Apparently NZ stopped using salt in the 1980's due to the corrosion. We now use grit and something called CMA (Calcium Magnesium Acetate)
              2007 NS Pajero GLS Diesel. Factory rear diff lock. Custom rear bumper. Custom side steps. Boos front three 3mm bash plates. Cooper Evolution MT tyres. Couple of CB radios. Provent 200. Traction control diff lock mod. ARB Comercial bull bar with custom brush bars and Domin8r X 12,000lb winch. Dobinsons and Kings raised springs and shocks. TJM snorkel

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              • #22
                Originally posted by rgrubby View Post
                Apparently NZ stopped using salt in the 1980's due to the corrosion. We now use grit and something called CMA (Calcium Magnesium Acetate)
                Ahhh there you go,

                I was there on holidi's & seen this grit truck out near Cadrona on the pass towards Queenstown.

                I'm from QLD Australia it was a tourist attraction for us

                Wondering what he was putting on the road, i knew it was gritty of course.
                Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Jasonmc73 View Post
                  Your conditions are like driving in the ocean on every salted outing i guess.
                  Kind of... That's the reason I didn't understood at first what is that big of a deal to drive through salty waters (which is mention on every Aussie offroad YT clip). I think that at least here is cold and the rust is not that accelerated as it would be in a hot summer day?

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                  • #24
                    Think the key is to rinse with fresh water, lots of it. I had a client who went to the beach every second weekend. Got home and walked inside. Within 4 years the car was completely rotted out. He had lots of cash so was not concerned. National Parks in Qld sell their beach going 4x4s at 30,000km. So maybe every 18month to 2 years. I doubt they wash them much.

                    I just pulled the 7c plastic inner rear guard from the Pajero. To my wonder the 1.5mm thick bit of plastic secures the rear bumper from flapping in the breeze. Sadly there is not enough plastic down there to fasten and decent type of mud flap, certainly not the 300W x350L land rover one I was hoping. So the small poor misty ones look about it sadly. Didn't get to check the front because it started raining, but a big wide mudflap stops lot and lots of crap from being chucked under the car, especially on the front.

                    The pic is the inner rear guard-mounded body work after the inner plastic guard is removed. You may be able to see sand in the lower V section of the pic. A nice place for mud to accumulate right on top of a seam with sealant. This is after lots of hosing following a week at the beach. I'm satisfied the salt will be neutralised, but matter holding water regularly can be a concern. Also another good reason not to play in the mud.

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                    • #25
                      Regarding extended mudflaps, whilst they have merit in preventing crud from finding its way onto bodywork, on any vehicle there is a downside.

                      Consider driving up against a decent sized mound or object where the flap is forced against the tyre.
                      Next thing you know is that the mudflap is being torn off . . . or else whatever it was attached to is being unceremoniously ripped off of the vehicle.
                      2012 PB Challenger LS Manual

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                      • #26
                        In the UK through winter we use rocksalt on the roads everytime the mercury threatens to hit freezing. Tin worm kills a lot of cars!
                        MY13 (NW) SG2 LWB

                        Foot Rest, Android Head Unit, EGR Resistor Mod (10k), "Car Shades", Other Stuff in Process....
                        My Build Thread.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jaffles View Post
                          Think the key is to rinse with fresh water, lots of it.

                          I have a client cleans beaches, local council, daily.

                          About 6,000 hours the machine i just traded over 3.5 years on the beach.

                          Bit of rust in steps , the crevices, corners, overall not so bad.

                          As you say plenty of fresh water.

                          Machines i delivered today have been treated with tectyl 506 & will see plenty of fresh water
                          The places you find sand after these hours is more than amazing

                          Once upon a time the use to keep them same as other plant 8 yearsish, the rims use to rot of.


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                          Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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                          • #28
                            I have another council whom swear by this, cleaning beaches as well, this brand & type only & warranted as long as authorised installer fits it apparently

                            https://couplertec.com.au/
                            Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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                            • #29
                              Local sanblaster charges $1,600 & his potion is paint the areas, chassis's axles etc & then he hits it with coat Tectyj 506.

                              Myself i think paint is great idea with repellent over it & plenty of rinse after use
                              Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Kingbrown View Post
                                Regarding extended mudflaps, whilst they have merit in preventing crud from finding its way onto bodywork, on any vehicle there is a downside.

                                Consider driving up against a decent sized mound or object where the flap is forced against the tyre.
                                Next thing you know is that the mudflap is being torn off . . . or else whatever it was attached to is being unceremoniously ripped off of the vehicle.
                                Yes been there done that. Chains are not much help either. The distance from the tyre and the flap being squashed against the tyre, dictates how long your mud flaps can be. In the bum of a Pajero the distance if not much, same for the front. It looks like Mitsi utilise the running boars as part of the crud control for the outside appearance, but under body gets caked.

                                I like rust proofing but think it will go so far. There are so many nooks and crannies and SUVness like plastic body moulding, poor mud flaps, water retaining carpet underlay on this thing its probably a big ask to see it past 10 years. Well if you go to the beach maybe 6-10 times a year.

                                There are also other parts to consider besides metal which are just as expansive to fix. Had a mate with a 2010 Challenger, buy 2020 much of the rubber in the engine bay was starting to fail. The wife's 10yo ford focus had headed down the same path. Its no secret manufacturers build cars to last a decade these days. Helps with turnover, long warranties, and part sales.

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