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  • Pajero NW GLXR Drawer build

    Hi all

    Thought I'd share some photos of last week's home project in the lead up to the Easter break.

    I decided after a while I'd buy drawers for the back of my Pajero (2013 GLXR , without subwoofer). We have a ORS platform and slide and the platform is great, gives you good access to the seat well but also a flat platform for storage, but I wanted a drawer or two.

    I don't mind the Titan drawer design but they're heavy. I looked at the aluminium drawers by RVSS and ORS but I didn't want the out of the catalogue configuration. I wanted to maximise access to the seat well, but decided against the hydrolic false floor idea.

    I looked at the XTM drawer and 4x4 camp kitchen but they don't tell the whole truth on those dimensions. The nuts on the drawer made it wider than advertised. Same with the 4x4 camp kitchen.
    Plus Chinese steel again.

    I also looked at OTS but really wanted a product I could see and touch, assess for myself (I'm in Sydney, most options are in Vic or WA)

    I also looked at fullboar fitouts but not thinking they'd be able to do much custom work beyond modular modification of their canning system.

    I also discussed with the guys at Drifta but they steered me to their own configurations and have about a 25- 30 week lead time right now.

    So... crunch came two weeks ago, with the news one of our dogs had a tumour and that suddenly cost 6K.

    Bunnings and a DIY it was. No time like the present.
    what can I say, black dog has been a bit hard lately and the news with our dog didn't help. The build DIY idea came with an opportunity to turn my mind to something practical.

    Starting with the concept of having seat well access but maximising strength, wanted to have a 15mm structural ply false floor.

    To add further strength under the false floor, I took the seat well cover out and used it as a template for a 15mm ply cut-out in place of the cover.

    Then I cut a false floor, with a 40" section down the middle but wings at the front and back. I used the existing floor panels as a guide and made the length about a metre. The width of the panel I cut was 1200 at its widest with that 40" section down the middle to fit within the left and right boot trim.

    As the edge against the seat was flat, but the edge on the back door is curved, i used used seat well cover cutout edge as a template for the curve against the boot door.

    I'd seen other builds cut their false floor to the edge of the seat well trim. I realised this meant that those false floors weren't level. They sunk a little into the edge of the seat well cover area. But since I'd made a cut out of the seat well cover, by placing that in place, it meant anything that sat on top would be level. It also meant i could gain a couple of centimetres by having it protrude 2cm over the trim edge, up to the rear door trim.

    By placing the seat well cut-out in and then placing the false floor on top, I put a few screws through both pieces to get the alignment locked in, then took it out again, turned over, traced around the edge of the seat well cut-out and put a crapload of wood and industrial glue between them. This means for the breadth of the seat well cut-out, the ply is actually 30mm thick.

    Given that, I was much more comfortable putting in some Cut-outs under the fridge slide and drawer to get into that seat well when I want to.

    Design wise I decided on the slide on the left being down low for my wife and kid, and a draw on the right. Taking the approach the space on the left needed to be exactly the width of the slide plus a cm (for later carpet) that meant I could use the rest of the width for a drawer. A really wide drawer allows for as big a cut-out for seat well access as I can allow.

    For the false floor, which was 15mm structural ply, to prepare it for bolting down, I bought two inch 5/8th bolts for the child latch points, and 6mm x 70mm bolts for the points the tie downs are normally. I put them in about level and put my false floor in on top. Using a hammer I banged each of the points the nuts were sticking up so the nut head would leave an impression on the timber. This showed me exactly where to drill through to allow me to bolt the floor down.

    I used 15mm ply for the sides as well.

    This is about when my design took a left turn. I figured j was going so well and budget wasnt that bad, I'd allow for a shorter draw length to create some space between the slide and draw, and behind the seats, for a water tank this meant my drawer enclosure was about 76cm long allowing for 20cm at the back for a tank behind the second row seats.

    Rather than traditional runners as slides, I elected to take a leaf out of Drifta design and used a router to cut 12mm wide 3mm deep channels to put some 750 x 12 x 6mm Polystone 7000 UHMWPE sheet strips.

    I countersunk the plastic (Not easy, it's very hard) and used a little selleys no nails, before screwing into place. In the drawer box, I put one strip each side, and three on the bottom. I figured a draw this big could be heavy. Three strips on the bottom would hold the weight, even though I was taking a big chunk out of the base under the drawer for seat well access.

    For the drawer sides and back, I used 12mm marine ply. I used18mm marine ply for the base of the drawer. Given there was going to be a big hole under the drawer, I didn't want the drawer base to sag and deform. 12mm marine ply for the panel behind the drawer and top panel.

    I routered and inserted three plastic slide strips under the drawer base to coincide with the slides in the drawer enclosure so when the drawer is in place they're roughly on bottom/top so the plastic holding the draw is in contact with plastic and greatly reducing friction (especially with some silicone lubricant).

    I was looking at the BOAB 50L slanted tank, but realised it was 35cm high, not including the cap which made it 38cm high. Too high for a drawer heightt and for a top panel /platform for my wife to put the shopping on top. (I'm tall, she's not)

    Hence, I ended up picking up a stainless steel (Not cheap) water tank for a 76 series Landcruiser.

    A lockable drop t lock and some carpet, finished it off.

    Carpetting was also new to me. I used contact glue. Kwik grip spray cans mainly, but actually found I preferred painting Sika contact fix.

    Not too impressed with either. Seems easy to lift.
    But I wanted to put some aluminium tile edge angle on the top panel so screwed that in a few places to hold the edges of the carpet down from lifting.

    https://crjb.net/?page_id=98

    I put it in Easter Friday, and just came back from camping up at Gloucester River. Worked a treat.

  • #2
    Originally posted by vicomte View Post

    Carpetting was also new to me. I used contact glue. Kwik grip spray cans mainly, but actually found I preferred painting Sika contact fix.

    Not too impressed with either. Seems easy to lift.
    good job, bud... and well done to you for recognising that the black dog had arrived and being proactive about it... sorry to hear about your dog...

    i am interested in your thoughts on the carpet glue... i have a set of drifta draws (loooong wait, as you said), and i am finally getting around to cutting and fitting the carpet onto the ply...

    what made you prefer the Sika product? i have yet to buy my glue for this yet...

    Paceman's NT Pajero

    Comment


    • #3


      Mate, that's a nice setup. Love the water tank.
      2016 NX GLS Factory alloy bar, Provent 200 catch can, Boos bash plates (full set), Stedi light bar, 40 litre Waeco, Titan fridge slide, Kings springs, Dunlop ATG3s, Auto-mate, Ultragauge MX 1.4, Uniden 8080s, more to come...

      Comment


      • #4
        Paceman asked about the carpet glue. I have a simple table in my NW, made from 20 x 20 x 2.0 RHS steel tubing. I have a perimeter frame with a centre rafter and the whole frame is topped with a lightweight ply. I put some car carpet over the top surface. I didn't use any glue - I simply wrapped the carpet over the edges and around the steel frame, and held it there with a thin slat of wood which is screwed into the steel frame. The carpet has never moved and it looks neat. The ply is only thin, but its span is only about 450 mm square, and I don't put anything heavy on it, so it serves my purpose very well.

        I also have a piece of carpet which covers the back door lining. The carpet is wrapped round a batten which is screwed into the existing holes in the door. This piece of carpet is invaluable - it has prevented lots of scratches etc on the rear door lining.

        Comment


        • #5
          Morning

          The glue seems strong enough but you have two forces you need to contend with. The simple lift away force perpendicular to the contact surface, and horizontal force, found when the carpet is stretched and trying to during back or on a vertical surface and the downward force of gravity or upward force of a fer bumps in the road, make it sheer. You also need to contend with finding a glue which will still work with a bit of wet. Like rain or some water getting into the seat well from a ford or causeway.

          The kwik grip is meant to be both horizontal and vertical, but within a couple of days it started to lift. At the edges. I need to get onto it asap before it keeps lifting. I think the better idea is use the combination or glue and mechanical.

          Spray or paint glue on both surfaces, use as much as you can without making it pool or boggy and wait till it's touch dry, which takes a few minutes.Then carefully roll the carpet onto the surface you want to applying pressure and trying to keep any air or glue bubbles out. I used a strip of timber to essentially drag over the carpet to push it down. Then at the edges, making sure there is plenty of glue, push it around the edge so it goes over both the perpendicular and if you can the parallel opposite edge. The wrap around gives you a heap of strength but also may interfere with your plans if you are carpetting the opposite side. I found putting the aluminium strips both protected the edges from knocks but also screws down the carpet edges so they don't lift.

          Why Sika? i basically stood in bunnings and looked at the side of selleys, parfix and sika and decided I wanted something I could paint, not spray and then looked for something which was for both horizontal and vertical surfaces, and would dry quickly as I was doing this at afternoons and nights on the side of work. So was kind of powering through. I didn't want something which would take ages to dry.

          Big tip though. Loosely precut the carpet first and apply it without glue to make sure you have the right size with the cm spare each side. Once the glue has dried its really east to cut off any excess carpet. Better to have too much than too little.

          I'll go out to the car and take a couple of photos of it in and upload them, as I forgot to do that.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have used Selleys "liquid nails" on various drawer units and boxes and am happy with the results. It holds the carpet nicely and as a bonus, it can used to glue the plywood joints. Lasts well. I have had a carpet covered box in my navara for about 6 years and the carpet hasn't moved.

            As it comes in a tube it's a bit of a pita to spread. No biggie though.

            Don't use the "quick" variety. It's water based and won't hold the carpet.

            2016 NX GLS Factory alloy bar, Provent 200 catch can, Boos bash plates (full set), Stedi light bar, 40 litre Waeco, Titan fridge slide, Kings springs, Dunlop ATG3s, Auto-mate, Ultragauge MX 1.4, Uniden 8080s, more to come...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by vicomte View Post
              Morning

              The glue seems strong enough but you have two forces you need to contend with. The simple lift away force perpendicular to the contact surface, and horizontal force, found when the carpet is stretched and trying to during back or on a vertical surface and the downward force of gravity or upward force of a fer bumps in the road, make it sheer. You also need to contend with finding a glue which will still work with a bit of wet. Like rain or some water getting into the seat well from a ford or causeway.

              The kwik grip is meant to be both horizontal and vertical, but within a couple of days it started to lift. At the edges. I need to get onto it asap before it keeps lifting. I think the better idea is use the combination or glue and mechanical.

              Spray or paint glue on both surfaces, use as much as you can without making it pool or boggy and wait till it's touch dry, which takes a few minutes.Then carefully roll the carpet onto the surface you want to applying pressure and trying to keep any air or glue bubbles out. I used a strip of timber to essentially drag over the carpet to push it down. Then at the edges, making sure there is plenty of glue, push it around the edge so it goes over both the perpendicular and if you can the parallel opposite edge. The wrap around gives you a heap of strength but also may interfere with your plans if you are carpetting the opposite side. I found putting the aluminium strips both protected the edges from knocks but also screws down the carpet edges so they don't lift.

              Why Sika? i basically stood in bunnings and looked at the side of selleys, parfix and sika and decided I wanted something I could paint, not spray and then looked for something which was for both horizontal and vertical surfaces, and would dry quickly as I was doing this at afternoons and nights on the side of work. So was kind of powering through. I didn't want something which would take ages to dry.

              Big tip though. Loosely precut the carpet first and apply it without glue to make sure you have the right size with the cm spare each side. Once the glue has dried its really east to cut off any excess carpet. Better to have too much than too little.

              I'll go out to the car and take a couple of photos of it in and upload them, as I forgot to do that.
              thanks for the in-depth reply... and the tips...

              did you just use a normal brush for the Sika?

              Paceman's NT Pajero

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Two Emms View Post
                I have used Selleys "liquid nails" on various drawer units and boxes and am happy with the results. It holds the carpet nicely and as a bonus, it can used to glue the plywood joints. Lasts well. I have had a carpet covered box in my navara for about 6 years and the carpet hasn't moved.

                As it comes in a tube it's a bit of a pita to spread. No biggie though.

                Don't use the "quick" variety. It's water based and won't hold the carpet.


                I used this product on some edges as I had some left over from a previous project at home

                https://www.selleys.com.au/products/...ls-heavy-duty/


                Originally posted by paceman
                thanks for the in-depth reply... and the tips...

                did you just use a normal brush for the Sika?
                Regular brush

                Have all your carpetting ready to go or plenty of turps, the brush gumms up quick when not in use as the contact glue sticks the bristles together.
                Last edited by vicomte; 4 weeks ago.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Of course now I've done a bit more reading, that selleys no nails isn't any good at holding down polyethylene, so good thing I used screws as well. Should have used this instead but clearly really expensive.

                  https://www.selleys.com.au/products/...-all-plastics/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I build off road campers ( and it is the same for teardrop campers) we need to test the wood glues etc before building the units. this involves following the manufacturing recommendations and gluing two pieces of ply or whatever timber together to then test (more than one sample.) Boiling water turned off the heat and drop the item in for 10 minutes. if it falls apart or becomes soft and able to pull apart it is no good.

                    Liquid nails is the worst for that and thus for any project like this I wouldnt use it. I use a special wood glue which will also glue carpet. IT IS A CARCINOGEN so you need to be gloved up but it cures with water. what I do is brush water onto the wood, put the glue on and spread and then stick the other material on (whether wood, carpet, wiring etc etc) This as it cures (if it is open to air bubbles like polystyrene but dries as hard as the knob of hell. This stuff hold the campers together without extra nails and is also water proof too. It is great stuff and would work well.

                    The name escapes me but I will find one of my old bottles and give you the listing for it.
                    95 White LWB Panda coloured GLS TD28 running 18psi 2inch lift, 2 inch body lift, factory rear LSD maxxis bighorn muddies 25,000klms after total engine rebuild - Club reged Currently around 307,000klms

                    Daughters - 2003 NP Exceed Silver Bone stoke getting a engine rebuild after a Major overheat (previous owner) - My current project

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oldn64 View Post

                      Liquid nails is the worst for that and thus for any project like this I wouldnt use it. I use a special wood glue which will also glue carpet. IT IS A CARCINOGEN so you need to be gloved up but it cures with water. what I do is brush water onto the wood, put the glue on and spread and then stick the other material on (whether wood, carpet, wiring etc etc) This as it cures (if it is open to air bubbles like polystyrene but dries as hard as the knob of hell. This stuff hold the campers together without extra nails and is also water proof too. It is great stuff and would work well.

                      The name escapes me but I will find one of my old bottles and give you the listing for it.
                      I agree. Liquid nails and their ilk is rubbish for longer term fixing.

                      Is it polyurethane glue that you're thinking of?

                      I'm a fan of it. Good stuff. Sticks like s*^% to a blanket and very versatile. It's the only stuff that I've found that will reliably re-attach the plastic sole of a shoe.

                      Look out for the ooze though. It bubbles up incredibly like expanding foam.
                      2012 PB Challenger LS Manual

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kingbrown View Post

                        I agree. Liquid nails and their ilk is rubbish for longer term fixing.

                        Is it polyurethane glue that you're thinking of?

                        I'm a fan of it. Good stuff. Sticks like s*^% to a blanket and very versatile. It's the only stuff that I've found that will reliably re-attach the plastic sole of a shoe.

                        Look out for the ooze though. It bubbles up incredibly like expanding foam.
                        My grey matter is telling me it is a sika product but yes carries on like you suggest. Clean up is with a knife and for carpet a weight across the lot works well. I will search and find it so we know.....
                        95 White LWB Panda coloured GLS TD28 running 18psi 2inch lift, 2 inch body lift, factory rear LSD maxxis bighorn muddies 25,000klms after total engine rebuild - Club reged Currently around 307,000klms

                        Daughters - 2003 NP Exceed Silver Bone stoke getting a engine rebuild after a Major overheat (previous owner) - My current project

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Great build mate! Where abouts did you source the Polystone 7000 UHMWPE from? When I built my drawers I used a few lengths of the yellow tongue/groove "electrictians snake" from bunnings as sliders, it was easier to source.

                          I used Sika spray adhesive for my carpet but wasn't very happy, a lot started to lift after a couple of months. I've touched up the bad areas with paint-on Kwik Grip instead (I hate working with that stuff but it was in the shed)
                          2013 NW GLX. 268,000km | ARB Deluxe Bar | Boo's bashplates | 4x4 Tough (Aldi) Winch | Underbonnet dual battery & db140i isolator | D697 265/70r17 | Rhino tracks & vortex bars | DIY rear drawers | Waeco CF40 | 60L water bladder | 2.5m awning | Vlad TC mod | UH8060.
                          --SOLD--1995 NJ GLS 3.5L Manual. 348,000km 2" Toughdog/EFS suspension, 265/75r16 Toyo Open Country A/T II

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                          • #14
                            Great build, can you build me one also? I have exact same model car as you! lol

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                            • #15
                              That looks very Drifta drawer & tank like
                              Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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