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Engine guard on Pajero

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  • Engine guard on Pajero

    I've seen the tv advt a few times for "Engine Guard"
    Just wondering if anyone in here has installed one on their Pajero.
    A quick search in ebay shows plenty of listings for something similar, but I'm a tad concerned about the sensor for the motor which they say "fits under any bolt on the engine"
    I think I would prefer something that warns me quickly of water loss, or low water level.
    Any feedback welcomed.

  • #2
    There are low coolent alarms available such as these...
    https://www.enginesaver.com.au/
    2007 NS Pajero GLS Diesel. Factory rear diff lock. Custom rear bumper. Custom side steps. Boos front three 3mm bash plates. Cooper Evolution MT tyres. Couple of CB radios. Provent 200. Traction control diff lock mod. ARB Comercial bull bar with custom brush bars and Domin8r X 12,000lb winch. Dobinsons and Kings raised springs and shocks. TJM snorkel

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    • #3
      'There are 2 types of 'Engine Guard'. One is the low coolant level alarm, the other a thermocouple which monitors the temperature of the area where it is fixed to the engine. Both have advantages and disadvantages.

      The low coolant level alarm is probably the better choice because once the coolant drops below the level of the probe, it should bring up and alarm. It doesn't measure the temperature of the coolant though, and, more importantly in my opinion, it can create an electrical path from the radiator to the engine block. Due to the radiator being made from a different metal to the rest of the engine, there is a galvanic potential built up. The radiator is always mounted in insulated mounts to allow for this. I have measures about 0.5 volts difference between the radiator and the chassis. This can cause problems with corrosion in the engine block.

      The other type is the thermocouple bolted on to a convenient part of the engine. This system allows you to monitor the engine temperature, and as the systems offer an audible alarm once the temperature reading exceeds a certain value. Since the thermocouple is bolted onto the engine somewhere, there is normally some airflow around it as well, cooling it down so you don't necessarily get the true coolant reading. The manufacturer of my Engine Watchdog recommends bolting the thermocouple to the thermostat housing. I fitted this unit to my NL Pajero, and the thermostat housing on a V6 engine is well away from the engine itself, so I ignored the recommendation and fitted it to a bolt on the head. This gave varying readings because of the external cooling of the thermocouple, but it was there if It was needed. I transferred the unit to my NW diesel Pajero, and it is now fitted to the thermostat housing. I also have a Scangauge II and the display shows, amongst other parameters, coolant temperature. The Watchdog generally shows about 2 or 3 degrees lower than the Scangauge. I have set the alarm on the watchdog to come on just above normal running temperatures. I am giving as much early warning as possible. If I stop the engine after a long hard climb, typically it will go off and screams very loudly at me. My wife screams even louder then... But at least I know it is working.

      There is yet another device which is probably even better than the watchdog. This is the Ultragauge. It can monitor up to 8 parameters in the engine including coolant temperature and also auto transmission temperatures, and from what I have read, can also give an auduble alarm. If I was starting out again, I would go for the Ultrqagauge.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by erad View Post
        '

        There is yet another device which is probably even better than the watchdog. This is the Ultragauge. It can monitor up to 8 parameters in the engine including coolant temperature and also auto transmission temperatures, and from what I have read, can also give an auduble alarm. If I was starting out again, I would go for the Ultrqagauge.
        Correct me if i'm wrong as i was looking to fit an Engine watchdog after you put the element of doubt in my mind about.
        You sometime back single handedly ruined my path of thoughts . No longer can i fit one of these & sleep at night
        The damn thing is perfect, no coolant & it buzzes, one tiny little LED light
        https://enginesaver.com.au/

        I have an Ultragauge, it does show tems & alarms can be set granted.

        If my engine loses coolant, example, rear heater hose blows & all the coolant is running down the road behind me as I vroom through the desert.

        The block of the engine will increase in temperature, but my coolant probe will not be increasing in temperature until the heat through the steel is extremely hot & heats the probe.

        This is where the engine watchdog will show change in temps?

        I have cooked an engine before & temp gauge never told me much slight rise in temps & i thought i would just limp home, i worked out why the car was smelly, no water
        Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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        • #5
          Jason:
          Sorry to disillusion you that way. I came about this problem a different way. My wife was going to Sydney with a friend in their TM Magna. A welsh plug blew out (after a lot more hassles with the dealer, eventually Mitsubishi came to the party with a new engine because the block was cracked. Back to the story. My wife was in the passenger seat and noticed a stream of fluid come out through the gap between the bonnet and the fender. That was the only indication. She said "Wendy - you are losing water". Wendy (the driver) looked at the temp gauge and saw it rise to about 3/4 of the way to the red and then go back to cold. All in about 3 seconds. They stopped and arranged a tow. Had my wife not seen the gush of coolant coming out, the engine would have been cooked and of course it would have been their fault for not looking at the temperature gauge.

          Earlier, I had a similar incident with our Sigma when a heater hose split. What alerted me to the problem was the fact that the incoming air on my feet went from warm to cold briefly - that caused me to look at the gauge and I saw that the gauge was about 3/4 instead of the usual midway. I know that I don't look at the temperature gauge enough and I am sure that my wife looks even less that I do, so I wanted something to act as an alarm. I had a friend make up a black box device which monitored the temperature gauge input. If it exceeded a certain value, it set off an audible alarm. Not perfect, but at least an attempt. When the Engine Watchdog came out, I ordered 2 units - one from my Pajero and one for the wife's Magna. She didn't like the way it screamed when it exceeded the alarm setting so I never fitted it to the Magna. Eventually the Pajero unit failed so I replaced it with the spare unit.

          I think you have it covered fairly well with the low coolant alarm and the Ultragauge which can send an audio alarm as well. As said above, my only concern with the coolant level alarm is the possible galvanic corrosion in the engine block caused by the electrical link, although this was addressed elsewhere and apparently had not caused a problem at that time.

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          • #6
            Running one on my NM, a 2 sensor unit. One on the coolant temperature sensor housing and one on the back of the right hand head. Both read about the same, head 1 or 2 degrees hotter.
            The reasoning was one to try to work out the temperature gauge ranges and prevent overheating. The other to protect the engine in case of sudden coolant loss. There is a 6mm bolt hole in the back off the head close to the head gasket, and also were oil drains out of head.
            If the coolant runs out head temperatures rise along with the oil temperature.

            I brought another one to go on the NW but need to find a comparable spot on the head.
            Should have had a look when I check the valve clearances.
            Scooby, Scott, Scooter, Whatever.

            Pajero 2013 NW VRX DID Auto. Basically Stock. 200k. Heavier rear springs to tow the GG’s. Automate also to tow the GG,s.

            Pajero 2002 NM GLS V6 Auto. Basically stock. 355k.

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            • #7
              Many thanks guys for all info provided.
              Much appreciated.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by erad View Post
                Jason:
                Sorry to disillusion you that way.

                As said above, my only concern with the coolant level alarm is the possible galvanic corrosion in the engine block caused by the electrical link, although this was addressed elsewhere and apparently had not caused a problem at that time. It is a concern i struggle to eliviate you have a fair point & do i want to find out or just fit watchdog in lieu off?
                Mitsubishi Pajero NX MY16

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by farcanal View Post
                  I've seen the tv advt a few times for "Engine Guard"
                  Just wondering if anyone in here has installed one on their Pajero.
                  A quick search in ebay shows plenty of listings for something similar, but I'm a tad concerned about the sensor for the motor which they say "fits under any bolt on the engine"
                  I think I would prefer something that warns me quickly of water loss, or low water level.
                  Any feedback welcomed.
                  I've run an engine guardian http://www.carsensors.com/Engine_Guardian.html on both my NP and now NW. The sensor is bolted to the head and seems to correlate to the coolant temp within a degree or two when the engine is fully warmed up. I use it to catch (hopefully) coolant loss before serious damage occurs.
                  14 NW GLX-R automatic, dual battery, Icom 440 UHF, redarc tow pro, home made drawers, Bushskinz bash plates, light bar, billies & lovells, ARB bull bar and other stuff.
                  04 NP GLX now gone

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                  • #10
                    Just finished fitting the NW with a twin sensor unit.
                    One on the bottom bolt on the outlet elbow next to the temperature sensor. The other one is bolted to the LH rear side of the head, under no 4 intake, just in front of a heater hose, spare 8mm bolt hole.
                    Only got it up to 60 degrees, head is reading 4 degrees hotter than the outlet one, both started at the same temperature.
                    Hopefully will get a run in tomorrow to see how they compare.
                    Scooby, Scott, Scooter, Whatever.

                    Pajero 2013 NW VRX DID Auto. Basically Stock. 200k. Heavier rear springs to tow the GG’s. Automate also to tow the GG,s.

                    Pajero 2002 NM GLS V6 Auto. Basically stock. 355k.

                    Comment

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