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Real world results and thoughts on 265 65 18 tyres fitted to post 2017 Pajeros

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  • Real world results and thoughts on 265 65 18 tyres fitted to post 2017 Pajeros

    Hello,
    I have read many things relating to the change in diff ratios on the post 2017 pajero's and the problems with installing larger rubber.
    Information that I was totally unaware off thanks to this forum by the way.

    What I am after is if anyone has fitted these 265 65 18 tyres to a post 2017 Pajero and the real world effects on torque, fuel usage, trans temps etc.


    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Practical tyre limitation on MY17+ is impact on gearing. 265/65r18 or 265/70r17 are really the largest practical size due to 6% taller final drive fitted to MY17+ than earlier models so the standard 30.5” tyre is equivalent in gearing to earlier with 32.2” tyres.
    Putting 265/65r18 (ie31.6”) on MY17+ is equivalent to putting 33.2” on earlier model. 275/65r18 (32.2”) is equivalent in effective gearing to 33.9” on earlier, etc.
    Taller gearing reduces power at wheels and increases transmission temps and fuel consumption. The taller final drive of the MY17+ is their Achilles heel for off road tyre mods. Of course the heavier the car the worse the impact.
    MY15 NX Exceed, Auto Mate PRO, Paddle shift, dual batteries, Redarc BCDC, MM tow hitch, Teshonka brake controller, Provent catch can, GME 3350 UHF, Boo's bash set, Falken Wildpeak AT3W 265/65R18, TPMS, Dobinson/Kings HD 45mm lift, Rhino bars, Drifta 270 awning, spare tyre lift, Ultraguage MX 1.4, Vlad TC mod, auxiliary PWR 23 row transmission cooler and radiator bypass, KAON barrier, MM nudgebar. Stockman allroada pod trailer with Drifta Stockton RTT.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by redbruce View Post
      Practical tyre limitation on MY17+ is impact on gearing. 265/65r18 or 265/70r17 are really the largest practical size due to 6% taller final drive fitted to MY17+ than earlier models so the standard 30.5” tyre is equivalent in gearing to earlier with 32.2” tyres.
      Putting 265/65r18 (ie31.6”) on MY17+ is equivalent to putting 33.2” on earlier model. 275/65r18 (32.2”) is equivalent in effective gearing to 33.9” on earlier, etc.
      Taller gearing reduces power at wheels and increases transmission temps and fuel consumption. The taller final drive of the MY17+ is their Achilles heel for off road tyre mods. Of course the heavier the car the worse the impact.
      Hi Redbruce,
      Thanks for the reply mate. As mentioned I have read all the specs as you have listed above i was just wondering from anyone that had actually put the 265 65 18 tyres on a MY17+ model and what were there real world thoughts on it. Im just tossing up if its worth it for me. Does it equate to an extra litre of fuel per 100 klm or is it more etc etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        Leighg75: There is lot of confusion over extra fuel consumption due to larger tyres. In this case, you are looking at using the same width tyre, but a slightly higher profile casing. So the only difference will be in the rolling radius of the tyre. Yes there will be slightly more flexing of the sidewalls, but this is minimal. The main difference, and this is where people get confused, is in the fact that the tyre being slightly larger, it records less km on the odometer or trip meter. So when you fill up with fuel, the actual true distance which the car has travelled will be the same, but your trip meter or your calculator will tell you that you used more fuel to travel that distance if you use the odometer or trip meter as the reference.

        In practice, the engine will be working slightly harder because it is running about 6% slower than with standard tyres. This will have some effect but unless the car is being driven in hilly terrain, this will not make much difference. Basically the apparent extra consumption comes from the fact that the odometer is reading lower distances than with standard tyres. I suspect that the difference in true consumption will be swamped out by other variables such as traffic, wind and terrain.

        I have heavy AT tyres fitted to my Pajero, and they do affect the consumption. They are nominally the same size as the original highway tread tyres, but I reckon in the long term, they have added about 0.2 L/100 km to my fuel consumption.

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        • #5
          The increase in tyre weight will also increase fuel consumption as will a more aggressive tread pattern, combine this with an increase in diameter and the combine effect can be significant even when you make adjustments for odometer readings. Fit a bullbar, roof rack and or a suspension lift and these also contribute to increased fuel consumption.

          I seem to recall some posted that their Gen 4 speedo was overreading by 6% but the odometer was correct so when they fitted larger diameter tyres the speedo was correct by GPS but the odometer was under reading based on the regular km road maintenance markers on the side of major roads in SA..
          https://data.sa.gov.au/data/dataset/...enance-markers

          OJ.
          2011 PB Base White Auto, Smartbar, Cooper STMaxx LT235/85R-16,TPMS, HR TB, 3 x Bushskinz, front +40mm Dobinson , rear +50mm EHDVR Lovells, Dobinson MT struts and shockers, Peddars 5899 cone springs, Windcheater rack, GME UHF, Custom alloy drawer system inc. 30lt Engel & 2 x 30 AH LiFePo batteries + elec controls, Tailgate hi-lift/long struts, Phillips +100 LB & HB, Lightforce 20" single row driving beam LED lightbar, Scanguage II.
          MM4x4 Auto Mate, Serial No 1 .

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