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  • Driving lights that are easy on eyes?

    I know that there are many driving light threads here, but I couldn't find any that covered this topic. If there is one, simply point me to it.

    I'd like a set of driving lights that are good for country and outback driving that minimise eye strain. Similar threads covering the type of driving include this one: https://www2.pajeroclub.com.au/forum...ad.php?t=46056

    My 2015 NX has the HID high beam, and originally sported a set of the MM option of Liteforce Striker 170 halogen lights. They seemed to add little to the spread or penetration of the HID high beams, so when wanting some more lights for a trip I decided to buy a set of 7 inch LED Kings Illuminators from you know where as an interim measure.

    These spread lots of light close, and the temp is too hot for my eyes (maybe 6000-6500), so the intense white light spread close makes driving at speed a tiresome experience for my eyes. I just can't cope with all the close intensely-lit roadside veg and posts flashing whitely past me for hours on end

    After reading many threads on different sites, my thinking has gone through the following progression:
    • upgrade to a set of Lightforce genesis LEDs as they have the lowest temp of 5000K (apart from some Cibies that have an option of 3000 IIRC), but then lots of people seem to rate halogen as easiest on eye strain
    • Fyrlyts for their halogen low-temp lighting - but I'm not sure I can afford the Amps to run them and the fridge at the same time
    • Hella Rallye 4000 FF halogens because they are cheap but I'm not sure they are actually any brighter/better than the Strikers,
    • to end up with - I'll just refit the strikers, fit at least one spread lens and angle them out a little so that they add to the width of the OE HID high beams.


    So having completed the circle back to where I started from, I've realised I need help (probably in lots of ways, but let's just stick to the driving lights for this thread)

    I don't need the latest and greatest. I will rarely use them, but when I do I want to make the driving as easy as possible without the lights adding a layer of effort to the task.

    Is this making any sense?
    Last edited by insect_eater; 15-08-20, 05:46 PM. Reason: tyoprgraphiacl error
    NX GLX manual, T13, XD9000, Koni RAID, Ultragauge, ISI carrier, pioneer platform, Lithium auxillary

  • #2
    I think you have already recognised the biggest trap of buying driving lights - bigger isn't always better.

    Back when I was young, better lighting was all about bigger numbers - bigger reflectors and more power.

    HIDs were a revelation, because people could get better light for less power! But it quickly became a contest again, with manufacturers one again entering a race to have ever higher power outputs.

    Now LEDs are coming into their own, and instead of a power race it's all about lux & lumens & distance & colour temperature - with too many seeming to focus on who has the largest numbers.

    I'm with you - I'm not interested in 5000K plus colour temperatures, and lighting up something 1km down the road. I'd rather have something around 4000K, some reasonable spread to the sides, and if it adds a little distance beyond factory high beams then that would be a bonus. But ultimately, I rarely drive far at night, so it's hard to justify spending the money on something I won't often use - so I can't help any further.

    Good luck.
    NT Platinum. DiD Auto with 265/70R17 ST Maxx, Lift, Lockers, Lockup Mate, Low range reduction, LRA Aux tank, bull bar, winch, lots of touring stuff. Flappy paddles. MMCS is gone!

    Project: NJ SWB. 285/75R16 ST Maxx, 2" OME suspension, 2" body lift, ARB 110, 120l tank, bullbar, scratches, no major dents. Fully engineered in SA. NW DiD & auto in place - a long way to go....

    Scorpro Explorer Box

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reassurance nj swb, I'm glad I'm not alone on my disinclination to needlessly join the driving lights arms race.

      Your last sentence nicely summed up what I think I'm after:

      "I'd rather have something around 4000K, some reasonable spread to the sides, and if it adds a little distance beyond factory high beams then that would be a bonus. But ultimately, I rarely drive far at night, so it's hard to justify spending the money on something I won't often use"
      Last edited by insect_eater; 15-08-20, 06:35 PM. Reason: missing word
      NX GLX manual, T13, XD9000, Koni RAID, Ultragauge, ISI carrier, pioneer platform, Lithium auxillary

      Comment


      • #4
        This is my situation. I live in a smallish rural town in NSW, and anything beyond the town requires good lighting to avoid things that go bump in the night. I have upgraded halogen globes for both low and high beam and a Stedi lightbar, fitted to a MM steel bull bar with a custom bracket. The lightbar is really an all rounder, giving a good distance and more importantly giving good usable light to the edges of the road at a reasonable cost. And the quality is very good. Have a look and make up your own mind. https://www.stedi.com.au/st4k-22-inc...light-bar.html
        2014 NW VR-X, with a few modifications and an Automate fitted Driving Pajero number three.

        Comment


        • #5
          I too am a fussy old bugger when it comes to colour temperature of lights.

          I was looking for 4000K to 4500K LED light single row light bar for my Challenger to supplement the factory lights with performance halogen globes. I ended up using a 20"single row Lightforce led light bar that has a colour temperature of 5000K because this was the warmest/lowest I could find.

          I still find this light hard on the eyes over long periods, especially the reflection of of road signs.
          It has a reasonable spread and moderate penetration and I am comfortable cruising at 110kph without undue eye stress.

          My solution is to wear Bolle Safety glasses with a light yellow/amber tint when I am doing long night drives and I find these help take the edge of the glare of the light bar but also the glare from the oncoming traffic, especially HID and LED retro fits that have poor beam control.
          https://www.bollesafety.com.au/reference/1615503

          I also wear a similar pair with ESP lenses in low light conditions as I find these assist with contrast.
          https://www.bollesafety.com.au/reference/1615504

          OJ.
          2011 PB Base White Auto, Smartbar, Cooper STMaxx LT235/85R-16,TPMS, HR TB, 3 x Bushskinz, front +40mm Dobinson , rear +50mm EHDVR Lovells, Dobinson MT struts and shockers, Peddars 5899 cone springs, Windcheater rack, GME UHF, Custom alloy drawer system inc. 30lt Engel & 2 x 30 AH LiFePo batteries + elec controls, Tailgate hi-lift/long struts, Phillips +100 LB & HB, Lightforce 20" single row driving beam LED lightbar, Scanguage II.
          MM4x4 Auto Mate, Serial No 1 .

          Comment


          • #6
            I was a halogen spot beam bigger is better fan before. Now I run IPF 900XS spread beam units with an aftermarket 55W HID insert at 4300 Kelvin. Watching spotlight beams dance on the road all night and the reflection from a concentrated spot beam was tiring. There is a train of thought that if you are upgrading a halogen driving light to HID 55W is the highest power globe you should use. Any higher and the beam pattern will have noticeable hot spots.

            I get about 600-650m of usable light and a healthy spread when driving on the highway from this set up I run now. I will eventually get around to fitting a roof mounted light bar for the odd occassion I need lighting at night off road. It will be around a 37 inch bar when I do. I will only need about 250-300m of light from the light bar as speed will be much lower and if I need distance I can always turn on the driving lights. There were times when I could have used a roof mounted light when travelling to a campsite after work on a Friday afternoon.

            If you are concerned about power draw you could move to a LED insert for your headlights. Most are around 5000 Kelvin or greater. But it will halve your power draw.
            Last edited by Lost1; 15-08-20, 09:15 PM.
            ML GLX-R Diesel Manual. Bushskinz bash plates, 285/75x16 Kumho MT51 & 16x8 alloys, 3" exhaust, Dobinson MRR 2"lift, MCC Bar and Wheel Carrier, 12000lb ICM winch, Dual Batteries.

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            • #7
              A previous thread re the Lightforce 20" single row and lots of other lights.
              https://www2.pajeroclub.com.au/forum...ad.php?t=50952

              OJ.
              2011 PB Base White Auto, Smartbar, Cooper STMaxx LT235/85R-16,TPMS, HR TB, 3 x Bushskinz, front +40mm Dobinson , rear +50mm EHDVR Lovells, Dobinson MT struts and shockers, Peddars 5899 cone springs, Windcheater rack, GME UHF, Custom alloy drawer system inc. 30lt Engel & 2 x 30 AH LiFePo batteries + elec controls, Tailgate hi-lift/long struts, Phillips +100 LB & HB, Lightforce 20" single row driving beam LED lightbar, Scanguage II.
              MM4x4 Auto Mate, Serial No 1 .

              Comment


              • #8
                Insect eater, I also agree with you and the other respondents.

                I have an old set of Hella Rallye 4000 spotlights (1 spread & 1 spot) with a 55w 3,600k kit (or maybe 4,00k? - it’s been years).

                I do a bit of night driving on the barrier highway and find this combo great - Plenty of distance with enough spread to see past the paddock fences and into fields. I’d love a fancy LED light bar but just can’t justify it given I’m actually completely happy with what I’ve currently got.

                My in-laws have a HiLux with 170 Lightforces and they are like dim candles compared to the HID converted Hellas (I usually don’t bother even turning the Lightforces on when driving the HiLux - even with clear ‘combo’ covers they have very little spread and are not much brighter than the new Narva semi sealed rectangular replacement headlights I fitted)
                Silver NT VRX Di-D

                ARB bullbar | snorkel | Bushskinz & Boo’s guards | UltraGauge MX | 2" lift | Cooper AT3 LT's | dual battery | Superwinch X9 | 80ltr diesel tank | 22ltr water tank | aux trans cooler | MM Lockup Mate | GME UHF | locker/TC mod | SPV EGR | rear LED work light | rhino platform | ARB awning | rear drawers ... & plenty of scratches

                My Build Thread - HERE

                Previously - NL Pajero (now owned by Forum member 'Gemster')

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by insect_eater View Post
                  I don't need the latest and greatest. I will rarely use them, but when I do I want to make the driving as easy as possible without the lights adding a layer of effort to the task.

                  Is this making any sense?

                  Absolutely.

                  Almost everything I said (and I said a lot, didn't I?) in that thread you linked remains true 5 years later, save that LED technology in the premium products has improved distance quite significantly.

                  But.....the colour of most aftermarket LED lights is awful, still. They're still marketing to the crowd that believes that a higher colour temperature is better, so 6500K is the norm. Manufacturers know better and their offerings are back down around 5000K which is a much more comfortable colour.

                  So, your thinking of going to halogen is very sound. Forgetting about the el cheapo bottom end junk and setting an upper budget limit of, say, $1000, you still have some good choices. What I'm thinking is that you want a light that will give you more range than your high beams but not necessarily be able to burn a crater on the Moon. At the same time, light up the sides of the road beyond what the standard lights can do.

                  Hella make some technically outstanding lights. The best are marketed in Europe and their range is so large and web presence so poor that it's difficult to find exactly the right light for a specific need. Downsides are glass lenses on bonded reflectors that are extremely expensive to replace in the event of breakage and waterproofing that isn't.

                  Lightforce only have the Genesis LED that might suit your needs. Fits in the price range (at the upper end) but high quality manufacturing and 5000K LED colour temperature make them serious contenders with the combo filters giving the kind of spread and length that you need.

                  Livid Lighting are not so well known but Australian with manufacturing in both China and Taiwan. They have two lights that might suit.

                  Night Armour Synergy is their 'budget' entrant. 5500K is a bit easier on the eyes and 800m range with a very wide pattern out to about 400m makes them a very suitable light. Well made and specified and around $650/pair.

                  Livid Xplorer is their smaller premium range product. For a 170mm light these things pack some punch and have a beam that is wider then pencil thin with a wide pattern close in. Around 800m maximum range is quite respectable. $900/pair is not cheap but reflects high quality. 5000K is a comfortable temperature.

                  All the above are LED because that's where marketing is pushing. Other than Hella, whose halogen offerings are restricted by UN/ECE regulations, that leaves Fyrlyt (ignoring the bigger Lightforce lights which won't fit on most Gen4 bullbars).

                  Both the Fyrlyt offerings use high wattage bulbs. 150W in the Luxsis 5000 and 250W (24V) in the Nemesis 9000. The lights themselves are the same, so no difference in the beams, except that the Nemesis is just brighter. This extra brightness does mean that the outsides of the beam pattern are also brighter, so the Nemesis appears to have a wider and longer beam. Just like putting 'Plus' series bulbs in your headlights.

                  Although Fyrlyts are high wattage lights, your Pajero will have no trouble handling the amperage. And your frig will stay cold. Using the correct harness, though, is absolutely essential.

                  Compared to even the 5000K LEDs, the Fyrlyts are much yellower at around 3400K. From the driver's seat, though, they still appear white and bright. The difference is that the CRI (Colour Rendering Index) is 100 compared to around 80 for LEDs and a little higher for HIDs (depending on bulbs). This means that colours appear more natural and, importantly, that browns are rendered more accurately. Thus you'll see wildlife better and also be able to discern differences in the road surface earlier.

                  As humans we don't see blue very well. It makes the pupils of our eyes open up and admit more light. Because LEDs are so bright this means that our eyes tire much more quickly. The better balance of a halogen bulb is less tiring, more comfortable.

                  I've had the Fyrlyt Nemesis on my NW for seven years. I did have the earlier lenses that cracked and were replaced, under warranty. The original bulbs are starting to get a little tired and should be replaced, but still perform quite well. Other than that, never had a problem. Lights are part of my business, so I've tried most of what is on the market but the Fyrlyts remain my light of choice.
                  Chris

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had the fyrlyt 5000 for a couple years (came with the car) and they were pretty good but had more of a pencil beam. I recently sold them and reinstalled my old Narva 225 with spread beam on both. I find it has noticeably less distance (but still better than high beams) and a much nicer spread, suits my driving better (which is similar to your needs).
                    SOLD 2004 NP 3.2 auto
                    NOW 2014 Ranger XLT auto

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jkwpajero View Post
                      This is my situation. I live in a smallish rural town in NSW, and anything beyond the town requires good lighting to avoid things that go bump in the night. I have upgraded halogen globes for both low and high beam and a Stedi lightbar,
                      Thanks jkwpajero, they are some good suggestions, an upgraded low beam is a good idea, and I know that Stedi have impressed many on this forum for their quality products. I'd like to try to find something that offers fairly low light temps, below 5000k, but the Stedis are higher than that.

                      Originally posted by old Jack View Post
                      I too am a fussy old bugger when it comes to colour temperature of lights.
                      I was looking for 4000K to 4500K LED light single row light bar for my Challenger to supplement the factory lights with performance halogen globes. I ended up using a 20"single row Lightforce led light bar that has a colour temperature of 5000K because this was the warmest/lowest I could find.
                      I still find this light hard on the eyes over long periods, especially the reflection of of road signs.....
                      OJ.
                      Thanks OJ, I think I'll wear my elevation to the FOB Club with honour, thank you! Both that light bar thread and suggestion of some filtering for the eyes are good ideas (I may just purchase some of those glasses to try as an interim measure, as I'm sure that they're good for driving into the sun as well). You reminded me about the road signs - yes that is the worst problem - I think I wince every time I pass one.....

                      One thing I've noticed with the LEDs is their very wide spread, even higher than needed - the photo of your lightbar's light shows the tree trunks lit up quite high. I find that this extra light is very distracting and tiring. It's like extra information to process that is ultimately useless, unless you're looking for nocturnal arboreal fauna...... This excess light seems a flaw in many LED lights - for me at least.

                      Originally posted by Lost1 View Post
                      .... Now I run IPF 900XS spread beam units with an aftermarket 55W HID insert at 4300 Kelvin. Watching spotlight beams dance on the road all night and the reflection from a concentrated spot beam was tiring. There is a train of thought that if you are upgrading a halogen driving light to HID 55W is the highest power globe you should use. Any higher and the beam pattern will have noticeable hot spots. ......
                      If you are concerned about power draw you could move to a LED insert for your headlights. Most are around 5000 Kelvin or greater. But it will halve your power draw.
                      Thanks Lost1, they look interesting, and that temp looks good. Good tips about brightness and saving some Amps -but I saw some LED headlight globes with 4000k temps, but they said they were for off-road use only. Are they legal to use?
                      Originally posted by geopaj View Post
                      Insect eater, I also agree with you and the other respondents.

                      I have an old set of Hella Rallye 4000 spotlights (1 spread & 1 spot) with a 55w 3,600k kit (or maybe 4,00k? - it’s been years).

                      I do a bit of night driving on the barrier highway and find this combo great - Plenty of distance with enough spread to see past the paddock fences and into fields. I’d love a fancy LED light bar but just can’t justify it given I’m actually completely happy with what I’ve currently got.

                      My in-laws have a HiLux with 170 Lightforces and they are like dim candles compared to the HID converted Hellas (I usually don’t bother even turning the Lightforces on when driving the HiLux - even with clear ‘combo’ covers they have very little spread and are not much brighter than the new Narva semi sealed rectangular replacement headlights I fitted)
                      Thanks Geopaj, It's interesting that the Rallye 4000s keep coming up as an option. The quality of the spread many comment on, and really attracts me to them, even if it means going 'backwards' I also looked at the XGT (Rallye 4000 Xenon), but I can't find a light temp for them, and maybe the aftermarket kits, though fiddly and ultimately more costly if starting from scratch have a lower temp than the XGTs. I think I will refit the 170s to play with them, but thanks for confirming that their use may be limited.

                      Originally posted by NFT5 View Post
                      Absolutely.,

                      Almost everything I said (and I said a lot, didn't I?) in that thread you linked remains true 5 years later, save that LED technology in the premium products has improved distance quite significantly.

                      But.....the colour of most aftermarket LED lights is awful, still. They're still marketing to the crowd that believes that a higher colour temperature is better, so 6500K is the norm. Manufacturers know better and their offerings are back down around 5000K which is a much more comfortable colour.

                      So, your thinking of going to halogen is very sound. Forgetting about the el cheapo bottom end junk and setting an upper budget limit of, say, $1000, you still have some good choices. What I'm thinking is that you want a light that will give you more range than your high beams but not necessarily be able to burn a crater on the Moon. At the same time, light up the sides of the road beyond what the standard lights can do.

                      Hella make some technically outstanding lights. The best are marketed in Europe and their range is so large and web presence so poor that it's difficult to find exactly the right light for a specific need. Downsides are glass lenses on bonded reflectors that are extremely expensive to replace in the event of breakage and waterproofing that isn't.

                      Lightforce only have the Genesis LED that might suit your needs. Fits in the price range (at the upper end) but high quality manufacturing and 5000K LED colour temperature make them serious contenders with the combo filters giving the kind of spread and length that you need.

                      Livid Lighting are not so well known but Australian with manufacturing in both China and Taiwan. They have two lights that might suit.

                      Night Armour Synergy is their 'budget' entrant. 5500K is a bit easier on the eyes and 800m range with a very wide pattern out to about 400m makes them a very suitable light. Well made and specified and around $650/pair.

                      Livid Xplorer is their smaller premium range product. For a 170mm light these things pack some punch and have a beam that is wider then pencil thin with a wide pattern close in. Around 800m maximum range is quite respectable. $900/pair is not cheap but reflects high quality. 5000K is a comfortable temperature.

                      All the above are LED because that's where marketing is pushing. Other than Hella, whose halogen offerings are restricted by UN/ECE regulations, that leaves Fyrlyt (ignoring the bigger Lightforce lights which won't fit on most Gen4 bullbars).

                      Both the Fyrlyt offerings use high wattage bulbs. 150W in the Luxsis 5000 and 250W (24V) in the Nemesis 9000. The lights themselves are the same, so no difference in the beams, except that the Nemesis is just brighter. This extra brightness does mean that the outsides of the beam pattern are also brighter, so the Nemesis appears to have a wider and longer beam. Just like putting 'Plus' series bulbs in your headlights.

                      Although Fyrlyts are high wattage lights, your Pajero will have no trouble handling the amperage. And your frig will stay cold. Using the correct harness, though, is absolutely essential.

                      Compared to even the 5000K LEDs, the Fyrlyts are much yellower at around 3400K. From the driver's seat, though, they still appear white and bright. The difference is that the CRI (Colour Rendering Index) is 100 compared to around 80 for LEDs and a little higher for HIDs (depending on bulbs). This means that colours appear more natural and, importantly, that browns are rendered more accurately. Thus you'll see wildlife better and also be able to discern differences in the road surface earlier. .....
                      .
                      Thanks for your (always detailed) response NFT5. I linked that thread partly because of your comprehensive summary, and I agree that little has changed since you offered your advice. I am attracted to the Fyrlyts, not least because of some of your previous posts about them. I think it is the close to midrange spread that I am seeking, and the top-end Fyrlyts look like overkill for my needs, though they remain very tempting...... I'll check out the other options you suggest.
                      Originally posted by Nab View Post
                      I had the fyrlyt 5000 for a couple years (came with the car) and they were pretty good but had more of a pencil beam. I recently sold them and reinstalled my old Narva 225 with spread beam on both. I find it has noticeably less distance (but still better than high beams) and a much nicer spread, suits my driving better (which is similar to your needs).
                      Thanks, Nab - I think this is the type of outcome I'm looking for. I'll have a look at the Narva's as well.

                      Ultra-vision (https://ultra-vision.com.au/) offer LED lights in 4000k options, with an interactive image on the website that shows the difference. Does anyone have experience with the 4000k version? They still seem to suffer from distracting upwards light spread common to many LEDs, but maybe the lower temp reduces the consequence of this issue. They seem to be at the pricier end of the market, but maybe one of their smaller lightbars would suit my needs.
                      NX GLX manual, T13, XD9000, Koni RAID, Ultragauge, ISI carrier, pioneer platform, Lithium auxillary

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by insect_eater View Post
                        T
                        Thanks for your (always detailed) response NFT5.

                        You're welcome.


                        Let me know if you want to try the Fyrlyts.
                        Chris

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Space is limited on the MM OEM alloy bar so fitted the Bushranger Nighthawke 18 LED Lightbar. Good spread and also penetration, comes with interchangeable filters to choose between wide and pencil beams.
                          Attached Files
                          2019 NX Pajero
                          OEM Alloy Bull-Bar, Bushranger Nighthawke Light Bar, Whispbar roof bars, Uniden UH8080S, Provent 200 Catch-can

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nab View Post
                            I had the fyrlyt 5000 for a couple years (came with the car) and they were pretty good but had more of a pencil beam. I recently sold them and reinstalled my old Narva 225 with spread beam on both. I find it has noticeably less distance (but still better than high beams) and a much nicer spread, suits my driving better (which is similar to your needs).
                            Did the 5000 have the option the switch between pencil and spread? I’ve got the Nemesis 9000. Love them. They have the ability to switch between pencil and spread by rotating the lamp at the back of the housing. I don’t see much difference between the two settings tbh.

                            The down side to these are the added complexity of mounting the transformers (12V to 24V) but really is a minor point because once done is largely forgotten about. There is also the slight delay to fire up if cold.

                            The positive is the ease on the eyes. It is a yellow light but the importance of the CRI of 100 is IMO vastly underrated. Contrast is maintained and this makes is so much easier, ie faster to recognise, what it is you are looking at. After using these for a minute or two the yellow is no longer noticed and switching back down leaves you wondering if you missed low beam and went straight to parkers.
                            NX GLS MY16 Auto: MM Towbar | Spare Lift Kit | Cooper ST MAXX 265/65R17 | SPVi Module mk3.1 | Autosafe Half Cargo Barrier | Torque Pro App | Donaldson 3um 2ndry Fuel Filter | Diff Breathers | GME4500 UHF | Rhino Rack Pioneer Platform | Roley's Rear Bash Plate | Bushskinz Underbody Protection | Airtec Snorkel | Onboard Compressor | Awning | ARB Deluxe Bar | Lightbar | Sherpa4x4 Winch | Bushskinz Sidesteps | Masten TPMS

                            Build Thread

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                            • #15
                              By the sounds you wan't find any solution with any lights if your eyes are being fatigued by the side vegetation.
                              What you actually need is a small punchy beam onto the road with minimum side coverage that has a good cut off.
                              You wan't find any driving ligts that do that! Heck mt bike lights have better smarter beam patterns.
                              One trap people fall into is they think Halogen is easier on your eyes because of the "warmer" light, but if the output & beam pattern
                              is not "right" your eyes can still strain. I bet you will still have eye strain on the firelights from all the glareback, it will just take longer to happen.

                              3000-3400K is a good range to shoot for, but most LEDs are all high which is just sad they are not offering warm white.
                              Always amazes me people who taught the high CRI...
                              You will never notice any difference in the world worth a hoot from say 70 to 90+ CRI, CRI becomes somewhat noticeable with bright colours
                              like say a tomato, it's important around the camp were there are vivid colours, but on a road with bland colours... & again If ones eyes are being so easily fatigued he has no hope in hell
                              of taken advantage of seeing wildlife more easily.

                              I have compared low ~70 & high 90-95 high CRI LEDs with many LED headlamps, flashlights, house lighting etc & halogen to HID to LED of similar lumens output
                              and seriously the difference is practical non existent. don't get me wrong high CRI is always better, but it's literally a tiny piece of a larger picture.

                              Funny thing is, you can have an LED that is warm white, yet it comes with a hint of blue, or green tints, colour temp
                              is just one of a handful of things to consider, general rule is cheapy LED gives off poor colour rendering, that is why you buy
                              the good stuff from brands who care.

                              Halogen lights do have an old school charm, like the good old days with just a pair of 130watt spotties before all this nonsense of plastering the front vehicle with LEDs.
                              2000 NM Exceed Auto V6 3.5

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